UNLocK Publications

 
 

Conflict Bulletin: Imo State - October 2013

Published October 24, 2013 | By Nate Haken*

Imo state has a population of approximately 3.9 million people, according to the 2006 census. The population of Imo state is predominantly Igbo (98%). The capital city of Owerri is the largest in the state. Imo is made up of twenty-seven Local Government Areas (LGAs). Imo’s economy mainly consists of exporting natural resources such as palm oil, mahogany, crude oil, and natural gas. Because of the high population density and the issue of over-farming, the quality of the soil is worsening.

Conflict Bulletin: Ondo State - September 2013

Published September 30, 2013 | By Nate Haken*

Ondo has a population of around 3.44 million people according to the most recent census (2006). The majority are of Yoruba descent, with a sizable minority of those from Ijaw subgroups, particularly along the coast. Ondo derives most of its revenue from the production of cocoa, palm oil, rubber, lumber, and cassava. Approximately 65% of the labor force is employed in the agrarian sector. The state is also rich in oil and minerals.

Conflict Bulletin: Bayelsa State - September 2013

Published September 30, 2013 | By Nate Haken*

With 1.7 million people, Bayelsa is one of the smallest states in the country, by population. Most are of Ijaw descent. Bayelsa produces between 30-40% of Nigeria’s oil and gas. In addition to the petroleum sector, the state also has an extensive commercial fishing industry and produces oil palm, raffia palm, rubber, and coconut. In February 2012, Henry Dickson (PDP) was elected as governor after a period of uncertainty in the wake of Governor Timipre Sylva’s termination in January 2012.

Conflict Bulletin: Delta State - September 2013

Published September 30, 2013 | By Nate Haken*

Delta is the second most populous state in the Niger Delta, with an estimated 4.1 million people. It has also been the most violent Niger Delta state over the last 3 1/2 years. It is well over the regional average in terms of incidents of violence per capita, although it has been improving slightly (notwithstanding an uptick in violence in the first half of 2013).

Conflict Bulletin: Rivers State - August 2013

Published August 21, 2013 | By Nate Haken*

Rivers, among the largest of the oil-producing Nigerian states, had been at the heart of the Niger Delta militancy until 2009. Now it is beset with a different array of issues as former combatants have turned to criminality, and uneven economic development continues to pose a challenge to sustainable peace and human security. This conflict bulletin takes a closer look at the patterns of conflict risk at the local level in Rivers state, using the P4P platform and drawing on data from UNLocK, Nigeria Watch, Council on Foreign Relations, WANEP, and CSS/ETH Zurich. Bulletins focusing on other states will be forthcoming.

Liberia: Mitigating Conflict through Responsible Resource Distribution and Management

Published June 14, 2013 | By Krista Hendry and George Wah Williams

Over the past decade, the Liberian economy has rebounded from fourteen years of civil war. Its GDP has had measurable growth since 2004 and the African Development Bank predicts a growth rate of over 7% in 2013. This is in part due to financial and technical aid from donor countries and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) of international companies in fields like mining, timber, rubber and palm oil. The input of aid in key sectors, such as infrastructure, facilities, and power generation, has the potential to strengthen the economy and raise the income level of the population.

National Reconciliation in Grand Gedeh

Published March 8, 2013 | By Patricia Taft, George Wah Williams

On a clear day in the middle of the dry season, it can take up to fifteen hours to travel less than 475 kilometers (350 miles) from Liberia’s capital city of Monrovia to Zwedru, the capital of Grand Gedeh County. Grand Gedeh lies in the southeast corner of Liberia, bordering Côte d’Ivoire, and has long been a restive region of the country. This is due to various factors including continued instability in Côte d’Ivoire, a large refugee population, and the lack of resources in the county.

Peacebuilding Through Local Mediation

Published March 6, 2013 | By Nate Haken
 
Conflict can devastate the livelihoods of people in the affected communities. But the story of the Ekowe community shows how local mediation efforts can make a big difference for peace in the Niger Delta. The footage for this video was filmed courtesy of the Rural Empowerment Foundation and facilitated by NIDPRODEV/LITE AFRICA. It was produced by the PIND Media Production Hub. The senior Peacebuilding Adviser was Robinson Ariyo.

Nigeria: Beyond Terror and Militants

Published December 10, 2012 | By Nate Haken, Filipa Carreira, Elizaveta Egorova, Rachel Hersh

Not every explosion in northern Nigeria stems from the radicalism of Boko Haram. Nor is every outbreak of violence in the Niger Delta the result of militants fighting over oil revenues. Rather, violence in its different forms is an expression of a broader and deeper fabric of social, economic, political, and security challenges. Given the wrong set of underlying conditions, collective violence can spark seemingly out of nowhere, whether or not there is a formal paramilitary group active in the region. Even when such organizations do not exist, in an area with past and current episodes of insecurity, latent structures may still be there, to be crystallized at a moments notice--in the event of a political contest, land dispute, turf warfare, or chieftaincy tussle.  Violence can sometimes be self-organizing.  Just add water.

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