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The Fund for Peace

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No State is an Island: The Importance of a Multisectoral Approach

Published June 24, 2013 | By Krista Hendry

In the 2013 Failed States Index (FSI), we call attention to the linkages between the underlying causes of state fragility. Essentially, no failed state is an island, and pressures in one state, no matter how seemingly isolated, often lead to wider destabilization. The pressures that can underlay and even lead to violent conflict are normally a combination of economic, social, environmental, and political factors that can reinforce each other, pushing countries or communities into greater instability if not addressed.

Failed States Index 2013: The Book

Published June 24, 2013 | By J.J. Messner, Nate Haken, et al.

The Failed States Index, produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure. By highlighting pertinent issues in weak and failing states, The Failed States Index—and the social science framework and software application upon which it is built—makes political risk assessment and early warning of conflict accessible to policy-makers and the public at large.

Press Release: Failed States Index 2013 Released

Published June 23, 2013 | News from The Fund for Peace

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Fund for Peace today released the ninth edition of its annual Failed States Index (FSI), highlighting global political, economic and social pressures experienced by states. The 2013 FSI ranks Somalia as number one for the sixth consecutive year, despite the country having improved its score since 2012 and having demonstrated promising gains in its fight against lawlessness, ineffective government, terrorism, insurgency, crime, and pirate attacks against foreign vessels. Meanwhile, Finland has remained in the best position, with Switzerland becoming the first non-Scandinavian country to crack the best three rankings. Nations at the best end of the FSI benefit from strong social and economic indicators, paired with excellent provision of public services and respect for human rights and the rule of law. The United States improved its score slightly, ranking 159th of 178.

Liberia: Mitigating Conflict through Responsible Resource Distribution and Management

Published June 14, 2013 | By Krista Hendry and George Wah Williams

Over the past decade, the Liberian economy has rebounded from fourteen years of civil war. Its GDP has had measurable growth since 2004 and the African Development Bank predicts a growth rate of over 7% in 2013. This is in part due to financial and technical aid from donor countries and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) of international companies in fields like mining, timber, rubber and palm oil. The input of aid in key sectors, such as infrastructure, facilities, and power generation, has the potential to strengthen the economy and raise the income level of the population.

State of Emergency in Nigeria: Balancing Hard Security with Peacebuilding

Published May 29, 2013 | By Nate Haken and Benjamin Kaufman

On 15 May 2013, President Goodluck Jonathan imposed a state of emergency in three states in northeastern Nigeria. In a televised statement , he called for “extraordinary measures to restore normalcy” in Borno, Yobe and Adawama states, where the domestic non-state armed group(s) Jama’atu Ahlus-Sunnah Lidda’Awati Wal Jihad (JAS), commonly known as Boko Haram, primarily operates. A heat map of violent incidents compiled by The Council on Foreign Relations’ Nigeria Security Tracker and collated by Partners for Peace shows the relative distribution of grievance-driven insecurity in the period between January and April 2013.

U.S. Strategies on Iran Nuclear Development

Published April 9, 2013 | By Kennan Hedrick

As pressure from Israel builds and international sanctions against Iran continually weaken the Iranian economy, President Obama has repeatedly asserted his policy to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran and his willingness to use force if necessary. In light of this policy, what is the best strategy to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran, and how should the U.S. pursue this strategy? To answer this question, this analysis evaluates U.S.-led military action, United Nations Security Council (UNSC) authorized use of force, and the dual-track strategy of sanctions and negotiations. Given the high costs of military action and the inability of the UNSC to authorize the use of force against Iran, maintaining a dual-track strategy is the best strategy for the U.S. to pursue to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran.

FFP Annual Report to the Voluntary Principles Plenary 2013

Published March 20, 2013

The Fund for Peace (FFP) is strongly committed to continuing its support of the Voluntary Principles on Security & Human Rights (VPs). We publicly endorse the VPs on our website and undertake efforts to raise public awareness of their existence as well as to support information sharing between those involved regarding implementation. We greatly welcome feedback from other participants as to how we could more strongly support the VPs going forward.

National Reconciliation in Grand Gedeh

Published March 8, 2013 | By Patricia Taft, George Wah Williams

On a clear day in the middle of the dry season, it can take up to fifteen hours to travel less than 475 kilometers (350 miles) from Liberia’s capital city of Monrovia to Zwedru, the capital of Grand Gedeh County. Grand Gedeh lies in the southeast corner of Liberia, bordering Côte d’Ivoire, and has long been a restive region of the country. This is due to various factors including continued instability in Côte d’Ivoire, a large refugee population, and the lack of resources in the county.

Peacebuilding Through Local Mediation

Published March 6, 2013 | By Nate Haken
 
Conflict can devastate the livelihoods of people in the affected communities. But the story of the Ekowe community shows how local mediation efforts can make a big difference for peace in the Niger Delta. The footage for this video was filmed courtesy of the Rural Empowerment Foundation and facilitated by NIDPRODEV/LITE AFRICA. It was produced by the PIND Media Production Hub. The senior Peacebuilding Adviser was Robinson Ariyo.

Nervousness Surrounds Kenyan Elections

Published February 12, 2013 | By Nóra Loncsár *

On March 4, Kenyans will once again vote for their local and national leaders. The increase in violence in the last year has raised fears among some national and international observers of the potential for another bloody ballot. In early 2007, the world watched in horror at the events unfolding in Kenya following the presidential elections. More than 1,100 people were killed and 350,000 displaced as violence engulfed the country that many had viewed as an oasis of stability in a turbulent region.

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