Nigeria

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Publications by State:
      Abia | Adamawa | Akwa Ibom | Bayelsa | Borno | Cross River
      Delta | Edo | Imo | Plateau | Ondo | Rivers
 

 

Chibok: Not an Isolated Tragedy?

Published May 8, 2014 | By Patricia Taft and Nate Haken
 
Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. Last month, in the capital city of Abuja, two bombs exploded at a crowded bus station claiming the lives of at least 88 people and injuring another 200. Then, that same evening in the northeast of the country, a raid on a school in the town of Chibok, Borno state, led to the abduction of over 300 girls, 276 of whom remain missing to date. The abductions, in particular, have spurred a wave of international outrage as the world casts about for who to blame and how to stem the violence. Activism tends to be categorical: accusing the government of taking too heavy handed an approach on the one hand, or on the other, of doing nothing at all. If that’s where the conversation ends, the recent groundswell of empathy will have been wasted.

Conflict Bulletin: Borno State - May 2014

Published May 7, 2014 | By Patricia Taft and Nate Haken*

Borno State, the location of the April 2014 abduction of nearly 300 school girls, is at the heart of what has been called the “Boko Haram” insurgency. The insurgency, perpetrated by a militant group called Jamāʻat Ahl as-Sunnah lid-daʻwa wal-Jihād (JAS), began in 2009 as a mass uprising against police in the states of Bauchi, Yobe, and Borno in which hundreds died. Violence de-escalated rapidly after insurgent leader Muhammed Yusuf was captured and killed. However, in 2011, the death toll began once again to rise and kept rising for the next three years. In May 2013, President Goodluck Jonathan declared a state of emergency in Borno, Yobe, and Adamawa to contain the violence.

Voices of Peace from Nigeria

Published April 21, 2014 | By Laura Brisard
 
From the outside, conflict dynamics can be bewildering in their complexity, particularly in a country as vast as Nigeria with telescoping fault-lines and polarities. After gaining independence from the United Kingdom in October 1960, the country fell into a civil war that killed over a million people before it finally ended in 1970. Military rule gave way to the Fourth Republic with the election of Olusegun Obasanjo in 1999. Since then conflict in Nigeria has included an insurgency in the Niger Delta which deescalated in 2009 as a result of an amnesty program for militants, periodic outbreaks of killing in the Middle Belt, and rising levels of violence in the Northeast.

January 2014 Conflict Bulletins Now Available for Niger Delta

Published February 4, 2014 | By Nate Haken
 
The Fund for Peace is pleased to advise that we now have new Conflict Bulletins, current for January 2014, available for all nine of the states that make up Nigeria's Niger Delta region. These Bulletins provide an overview of Abia, Akwa Ibom, Bayelsa, Cross River, Delta, Edo, Imo, Ondo, and Rivers states. These Conflict Bulletins draw upon data from ACLED, AOAV, Nigeria Watch, CFR's Nigeria Security Tracker, FFP's UNLocK, WANEP, and CSS/ETH Zurich. P4P compiles state and LGA-level conflict bulletins to highlight patterns and trends in conflict and peacebuilding.

Conflict Bulletin: Imo State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Patricia Taft

Imo state has a population of approximately 3.9 million people, according to the 2006 census. The population of Imo state is predominantly Igbo (98%). The capital city of Owerri is the largest in the state. Imo is made up of twenty-seven Local Government Areas (LGAs). Imo’s economy mainly consists of exporting natural resources such as palm oil, mahogany, crude oil, and natural gas. Due to the high population density and over-farming, the quality of the soil is reportedly worsening.

Conflict Bulletin: Edo State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Valentin Robiliard

Landlocked between Ondo, Kogi and Delta States, Edo is home to about 3.2 million people (2006 census), predominantly of Edo, Bini, Owan, Esan, and Afemai background. Edo’s economy centers on agriculture, including food crops such as yams, cassava, rice or maize and cash crops such as rubber, palm oil, cotton, cocoa and timber. The State’s capital, Benin City, is the center of Nigeria’s rubber industry. Edo also contains significant deposits of granite, limestone, marble, lignite, crude oil, gold, and kaolin clay.

Conflict Bulletin: Cross River State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Valentin Robiliard

To the southeast of Nigeria, the coastal state of Cross River is home to approximately 2.9 million people (2006 census), predominantly of Efik, Ejagham and Bekwarra background. One of the fastest growing states in Nigeria, Cross River is endowed with vast mineral resources, plentiful arable land, and a growing number of tourist attractions. Liyel Imoke, of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP), was elected governor of Cross River in August 2008 after his first electoral victory of April 2007 was annulled by an Election Appeal Tribunal. He was re-elected in February 2012.

Conflict Bulletin: Abia State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Patricia Taft

Abia State has an estimated population of 2.4 million people, predominantly of Igbo origin. Comparatively, it has not experienced the levels of violence and insecurity that other states in the Niger Delta have over the time period analyzed (although there was a sharp uptick in violence in 2010 associated with a surge in kidnappings). Abia produces about 27% of Nigeria’s crude oil and a significant amount of its natural gas. It is also rich in yam, maize, rice, potatoes, and cashews.

Conflict Bulletin: Akwa Ibom State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Valentin Robiliard

Akwa Ibom has a population of about 3.9 million people according to the 2006 census. Predominantly inhabited by the Ibibio people, the state is also home to Annang, Oron, Obolo and Eket communities. Endowed with large deposits of crude oil, condensate and gas, Akwa Ibom is among the largest petroleum producers in Nigeria. Agriculture also constitutes an important income-generating activity in the state, particularly the farming of palm produce, rubber, cocoa, rice, cassava, yam, plantain, banana, maize, and timber.

Conflict Bulletin: Bayelsa State - January 2014

Published January 31, 2014 | By Patricia Taft

With 1.7 million people, Bayelsa is one of the smallest states in the country, by population. Most are of Ijaw descent. Bayelsa produces between 30-40% of Nigeria’s oil and gas. In addition to the petroleum sector, the state has an extensive commercial fishing industry and produces oil palm, raffia palm, rubber, and coconut. In February 2012, Henry Dickson (PDP) was elected as governor after a period of uncertainty in the wake of Governor Timipre Sylva’s termination in January 2012. Over the last 3 1/2 years, incidents of insecurity in Bayelsa included cult violence, abductions, and attacks on energy infrastructure. Conflict factors were mainly reported around the capital of Yenagoa.

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