Nigeria

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Publications by State:
      Abia | Adamawa | Akwa Ibom | Bayelsa | Borno | Cross River
      Delta | Edo | Imo | Plateau | Ondo | Rivers
 

 

Conflict Bulletin: Imo State - July 2014

Published July 31, 2014 | By Nate Haken*

Imo state has a population of approximately 3.9 million people, according to the 2006 census. The population is predominantly Igbo (98%). The capital city of Owerri is the largest in the state. Imo is made up of 27 Local Government Areas (LGAs). Imo’s economy mainly consists of exporting natural resources such as palm oil, mahogany, crude oil, and natural gas. Due to the high population density and over-farming, the quality of the soil is reportedly worsening, according to local government reports.

Conflict Bulletin: Akwa Ibom State - July 2014

Published July 29, 2014 | By Patricia Taft*

Akwa Ibom has a population of about 3.9 million people according to the 2006 census. Predominantly inhabited by the Ibibio people, the state is also home to Annang, Oron, Obolo and Eket communities. Endowed with large deposits of crude oil, condensate and gas, Akwa Ibom is among the largest petroleum producers in Nigeria. Agriculture also constitutes an important income-generating activity in the state, particularly the farming of palm produce, rubber, cocoa, rice, cassava, yam, plantain, banana, maize, and timber.

Conflict Bulletin: Ondo State - July 2014

Published July 29, 2014 | By Patricia Taft*

Ondo state has a population of approximately 3.44 million according to the most recent census (2006). The majority are of Yoruba descent, with a sizable minority of those from Ijaw subgroups, particularly along the coast. Ondo derives most of its revenue from the production of cocoa, palm oil, rubber, lumber, and cassava. Approximately 65% of the labor force is employed in the agrarian sector. The state is also rich in oil and minerals. On a per capita basis, violence in Ondo was relatively low in comparison to the other Niger Delta states according to Nigeria Watch data. It did, however, see a gradual increase in reported insecurity throughout 2012-2014, as reported by multiple sources.

Conflict Bulletin: Edo State - July 2014

Published July 15, 2014 | By Nate Haken*

Landlocked between Ondo, Kogi and Delta States, Edo is home to about 3.2 million people (2006 census), predominantly of Edo, Bini, Owan, Esan, and Afemai background. Edo’s economy centers around agriculture, including food crops such as yams, cassava, rice or maize and cash crops such as rubber, palm oil, cotton, cocoa and timber. Edo’s capital, Benin City, is the center of Nigeria’s rubber industry. Edo also contains significant deposits of granite, limestone, marble, lignite, crude oil, gold, and kaolin clay. Edo’s State governor, Adams Aliyu Oshiomhole, took office in November 2008 after winning an appeal in the 2007 elections, which had initially declared his rival, Oserheimen Osunbor, as governor. In July 2012, Oshiomhole was reelected for a second term in a landslide victory. He is one of six governors affiliated with the Action Congress of Nigeria Party (ACN).

Conflict Bulletin: Cross River State - July 2014

Published July 14, 2014 | By Patricia Taft*

The coastal state of Cross River in the southeastern part of Nigeria is home to approximately 2.9 million people (2006 census), predominantly of Efik, Ejagham and Bekwarra background. One of the fastest growing states in Nigeria, Cross River is endowed with vast mineral resources, plentiful arable land, and a growing number of tourist attractions. Liyel Imoke of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP) was elected governor of Cross River in August 2008 after his first electoral victory of April 2007 was annulled by an Election Appeal Tribunal. He was re-elected in February 2012. For years, Cross River was the stage to a heated territorial dispute between Nigeria and Cameroon over the oil-rich Bakassi peninsula.

Conflict Bulletin: Delta State - July 2014

Published July 14, 2014 | By Patricia Taft*

Delta is the second most populous state in the Niger Delta, with an estimated 4.1 million people. The state produces about 35% of Nigeria’s crude oil and a considerable amount of its natural gas. It is also rich in root and tuber crops, such as potatoes, yams, cassava, and coco yams. Delta has a legacy of ethnic and political tensions which flared in the late 1990s and again in 2003. The 2009 Amnesty Program was instrumental in reducing violence and fatalities associate with militancy. In 2010, however, there was a spike in insurgency/counter-insurgency activity with a notable incident that reportedly occurred in the Burutu Local Government Area (LGA) in December.

Conflict Bulletin: Bayelsa State - July 2014

Published July 10, 2014 | By Nate Haken*

With 1.7 million people, Bayelsa is one of the smallest states in the country, by population. Most residents are of Ijaw descent. Bayelsa produces between 30-40% of Nigeria’s oil and gas. In addition to the petroleum sector, the state has an extensive commercial fishing industry and produces oil palm, raffia palm, rubber, and coconut. In February 2012, Henry Dickson (PDP) was elected as governor after a period of uncertainty in the wake of Governor Timipre Sylva’s termination in January 2012. Since then the number of fatalities has reduced, but has fluctuated with periodic instances of cult violence, abductions, and attacks on energy infrastructure.

Conflict Bulletin: Rivers State - July 2014

Published July 10, 2014 | By Nate Haken*

Among the largest of the oil-producing Nigerian states, Rivers had been at the heart of the Niger Delta militancy until 2009. Currently, the state is beset with a different array of issues as some former combatants have turned to criminality and uneven economic development continues to pose a challenge to sustainable peace and human security. The following bulletin is a closer look at the patterns of conflict risk at the local level.

Voices of Peace from Nigeria - Children in Conflict

Published July 8, 2014 | By Laura Brisard

When there is conflict, the entire community is affected. The most vulnerable, however, are children. Two members of the Partners for Peace network tell their stories about what happened to them more than 40 years ago, when they were little children during the Biafran War. These events may have occurred a long time ago, but the stories still resonate today. Around the world, as many as a billion children live in conflict affected areas. Half the Nigerian population is under the age of 18, making it among the youngest countries in the world. In Nigeria and elsewhere, it is the most innocent who are the most at risk during times of violence.

Chibok: Not an Isolated Tragedy?

Published May 8, 2014 | By Patricia Taft and Nate Haken
 
Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. Last month, in the capital city of Abuja, two bombs exploded at a crowded bus station claiming the lives of at least 88 people and injuring another 200. Then, that same evening in the northeast of the country, a raid on a school in the town of Chibok, Borno state, led to the abduction of over 300 girls, 276 of whom remain missing to date. The abductions, in particular, have spurred a wave of international outrage as the world casts about for who to blame and how to stem the violence. Activism tends to be categorical: accusing the government of taking too heavy handed an approach on the one hand, or on the other, of doing nothing at all. If that’s where the conversation ends, the recent groundswell of empathy will have been wasted.

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