Resources on Chemical Weapons


 

Only articles and reports are listed here.
Click to see Fund for Peace Blog Posts on Chemical Weapons.

Briefing: Ensuring Compliance in Syria

Published October 25, 2013 | By Jacob Grunberger

The details of the destruction of the Syrian government’s one thousand tons of chemical agents are still being finalized by the United States, Russia, and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the implementing body of the 1997 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). In addition to the negotiations, however, another question looms large pertaining to the chemical disarmament in Syria. Namely, how should the international community react if Syria or any other States Party to the CWC does not comply with the agreed upon framework?

Getting Serious About Chemical Weapons

Published September 20, 2013 | By Patricia Taft, Jacob Grunberger

With dueling opinion pieces gracing the pages of the American and Russian press by presidents and senators, and months of strategizing, vacillating, and handwringing, the crisis over the use of chemical weapons in Syria is a problem that seems to be going nowhere meaningful fast. The genesis of the latest crisis was the August 21, 2013 series of missile strikes on the Damascus suburb of Ghouta, a neighborhood suspected of harboring militant forces opposed to the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. Soon after, videos and images began to surface depicting dead civilians, including children, who appeared to bear no signs of injuries resulting from explosives or conventional weapons fire.

Briefing: Chemical Weapons

Published September 19, 2013 | By Jacob Grunberger

The advent of chemical weapons, originally in the forms of chlorine and mustard gasses, is often attributed to being a direct byproduct of the industrialized nature of World War I. The first major use of this technology occurred on April 22, 1915 by the German military at Leper, Belgium. After witnessing the destructive capabilities of poison gas on entrenched soldiers, the European powers began to combine chemical weapons with long-range artillery, ultimately accounting for over one million casualties by the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.