Archived Articles and Reports from
The Fund for Peace

  Only articles and reports through 2014 are listed here.
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Niger Delta Conflict Tracker 2017 Q2

Published August 24, 2017 | By Partners for Peace, Fund for Peace, PIND

This quarterly tracker looks at the trends and patterns of conflict risk factors and incidents of violence, and their pressures on peace and stability in the Niger Delta. It is not designed as a conflict analysis, but rather, it is intended to update stakeholders on patterns and trends in conflict risk and violence. Understanding the deeper conflict drivers, implications, and mitigating options requires a robust participatory, qualitative analysis of these trends by local stakeholders in affected communities, including women, traditional authorities, political leaders, youths, private sector actors, and others. We hope that these trackers provide such stakeholders with information to inform that process of analysis and joint planning to promote sustainable peace in the Niger Delta.

Ogoniland: Remediating a Troubled Region

Published August 10, 2017 | By Partners for Peace, Fund for Peace, PIND

Ogoniland has long been an area symbolic in the minds of people both inside and outside of the Niger Delta for its struggle against environmental degradation caused by resource exploitation. In the early 1990s, the region came to international prominence after the death of environmental activist Kenule Saro-Wiwa. The struggle of Saro-Wiwa and other Ogoni activists eventually led to the cessation of oil production activities in the area in 1993, but widespread environmental damage was already done. A United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) assessment on the impacts of decades of resource exploitation in Ogoniland, commissioned in 2006 by former President General Olusegun Obasanjo and released in 2011, has informed a wide scale government clean-up of the region. At the same time, Ogoniland has been beset by many of the same conflict dynamics that affect the wider Niger Delta; including cultism, militancy, the proliferation of weapons, intra- and intercommunal conflict, chieftaincy tussles, and widespread youth unemployment. The region has become highly polarized during recent election cycles, with politicians, militants and security figures recruiting cultists and restive youth to intimidate and coerce adversaries and opponents.

Fragile States Index 2017 Launch Event

FFP Event - May 15, 2017

Join us at the UN Foundation for the launch of the thirteenth annual Fragile States Index, on Monday, May 15 at the United Nations Foundation in Washington, D.C. The Fragile States Index remains a leading tool that highlights current trends in social, economic and political pressures that affect all states, but can strain some beyond their capacity to cope. Apart from the impact on their people, fragile states present the international community with a variety of challenges.

Niger Delta Conflict Tracker 2016 Q3

Published December 12, 2016 | By Partners for Peace, Fund for Peace, PIND

This quarterly tracker looks at the trends and patterns of conflict risk factors and incidents of violence, and their pressures on peace and stability in the Niger Delta. It is not designed as a conflict analysis, but rather, it is intended to update stakeholders on patterns and trends in conflict risk and violence. Understanding the deeper conflict drivers, implications, and mitigating options requires a robust participatory, qualitative analysis of these trends by local stakeholders in affected communities, including women, traditional authorities, political leaders, youths, private sector actors, and others. We hope that these trackers provide such stakeholders with information to inform that process of analysis and joint planning to promote sustainable peace in the Niger Delta.

Voluntary Principles in Ghana Update: July-September 2016

Published October 31, 2016 | By J.J. Messner and Hannah Blyth

Using the information shared in the local dialogues, the July 2016 roundtable provided a forum for representatives from the four regions to voice concerns and issues at a national level. It also represent-ed an important opportunity for different communities, government stakeholders and mining, oil and gas companies to connect and share lessons learned and best practices. To provide a more national-level perspective, were stakeholders from the Government of Ghana including the Petroleum Commission, Ministry of Justice and Attorney General, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), the Ghana Army, Navy and Police, and Ministry of the Interior.

Growing Insecurity in Rivers: Impacts of Re-Run Elections

Published June 14, 2016 | By The Fund for Peace and Partnership Initiatives in the Niger Delta*

Elections have been a cyclical driver of conflict risk and violence in Rivers state since 1999. The state was reported to have had the highest number of violent incidents during the 2015 general elections in Nigeria. In the lead-up and aftermath of the 2016 legislative election rerun on 19 March, Rivers was once again marred by widespread political and cult violence with fatalities in the lead-up surpassing any period since 2009. This ongoing cycle of insecurity is not only impacting the citizens of the state, but also business.

Voluntary Principles in Ghana Update: January-March 2016

Published April 30, 2016 | By J.J. Messner and Hannah Blyth

The first local dialogue was held on February 22 in Bolgatanga, Upper East region. The dialogue, led by WANEP-Ghana, was attended by stakeholders including the Ghana Police Service, the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), Traditional leadership, the Shanxii Mining Company, small scale mining groups, the Talensi and Nabdam District Assemblies, the local media (Ghana News Agency) and the Lands Commission.

Confronting the Unthinkable: Suicide Bombers in Northern Nigeria (Full Report)

Published February 29, 2016 | By Patricia Taft and Kendall Lawrence*

The use of women and children as weapons of war in northern Nigeria and in neighboring countries is undoubtedly horrific, there is often the tendency to paint the phenomenon with a broad brush that identifies the bombers as victims without agency, or the right of choice, in their fate. To the extent that this assumption has implications for response, it should be acknowledged that the question of agency is inevitably much more complex and uncomfortable. Certainly, no ten-year-old child can be said to be of a mental and emotional maturity to make such a fatal choice. However, the assumption that the women and children who have carried out these attacks are all abductees is false.

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